login   |    register

Scale Modeling Sponsors

See Your Ad Here!

Hobby Boss [ MORE REVIEWS ] [ WEB SITE ] [ NEW STORIES ]

In-Box Review
135
Late T-35 Tank
Soviet T-35 Heavy Tank Late Production
  • move

by: Darren Baker [ CMOT ]


Originally published on:
Armorama

Introduction

Hobby Boss has released a number of T-35 models with various subtle differences, and who can blame them for that. This offering being classed as a late production is I suspect the last in the line for at least a while, after all I cannot think where else they can go with it due to less than 100 tanks being produced. This particular offering is a little confusing for me as it has a number of features I know of for the T-35, but I cannot find any evidence to support one in this configuration.

The following text is the introduction supplied by Hobby Boss;
The T-35 was a Soviet multi-turreted heavy tank of the interwar period and early Second World War that saw limited production and service with the Red Army. It was the only five-turreted heavy tank in the world to reach production but proved to be slow and mechanically unreliable. Most of the T-35 tanks still operational at the time of Operation Barbarossa were lost due to mechanical failure rather than enemy action. Outwardly it was large but internally the spaces were cramped with the fighting compartments separated from each other. Some of the turrets obscured the entrance hatches.

Contents

Hobby Boss are one of a few companies that goes to some lengths to make sure their product reaches you in the same condition it left the factory. Supplied in a substantial cardboard tray and separate cardboard lid along with sheet foam packing to protect delicate parts, I consider Hobby Boss highly for their approach. Inside the box you will find the contents sealed inside several plastic bags that break down as follows;

14 green sprues
Lower hull
Upper hull
2 clear lenses
3 photo etched frets
Length of copper twist wire
Instruction booklet
A colour painting guide
Promotional flyer

Review

An inspection of the contents of these box will not surprise most who have purchased one of the previous T-35 offerings from Hobby Boss, for those that have not read on.

The mouldings would seem to suggest that the moulds for the T-35 are holding up very well, there is nothing of note as regards moulding defects. As you would expect of injection moulded plastic kits there are ejector pin marks and seam lines to deal with, but these are few and far between.

The suspension for this model is a good place to start. Hobby Boss has done a very good job of replicating the suspension units of this tank. The springs are solid but once everything is together they are all but hidden from view. The wheels are fairly featureless, but from what reference I have they do appear to be accurate. The tracks in this offering are link and length offerings, as the suspension on this model is set I would suggest that this track type is the best compromise as regards detail and ease of use; most of the time I prefer individual track links, but with a model of this size I think it would be soul destroying to tackle that many individual links. A word of advice attach the tracks to the model before adding the upper track guards, I promise your sanity will thank you.

The lower hull in this model has been very well tackled by Hobby Boss; its long length and high sides make it prone to distortions, but Hobby Boss has prevented this issue occurring by moulding five vertical ribs spaced evenly down the length of the hull on each side. I also know that once you secure the upper hull to it you get a very stable and strong hull to build too. The detail on the upper hull and general look reminds me of the KV tanks, especially at the front just longer. One of the things I like is that Hobby Boss has provided clear lenses for the front lights. The housings for the lights have the ability to tip forward; this will protect the lenses and allow for running without lights. The rear engine deck intakes are also high points of this model I feel.

The turrets are what get the attention on models of this type due to the number of them present. The four smaller turrets are all conical in shape and that is a signifier of late production vehicles, it apparently provided thicker armour. The two smallest turrets are equipped with machine guns only, all of the machine guns provided with this model are detailed from stock to muzzle and are supplied with separate drum magazines. The barrels of the secondary armament have been slide moulded something of which I like to see as only turned barrels are better. The barrel does appear visually to be a good match for the real thing. The main gun looks good from the outside, but like the secondary armament has nothing on the inside, that is a pity as all of the hatches can be displayed open but careful figure choice will be needed to hide the empty interior.

Conclusion

This offering from Hobby Boss is a nice kit and it has a lot of nice details, but I cannot help thinking that if you have built any of the other offerings would you want another? The details are different from the first offering in terms of turret shape and armament, I even liked the aerial assembly around the turret as it added eye catching detail. This offering however I cannot find any photographic evidence for, I have found variations but no match. There is also something that is common to Hobby Boss that I do not like and that is the copper wire provided for the tow cable, it is nasty and much better options are available.
SUMMARY
Highs: Slide moulding for the main weapons is good to see as are the clear lenses for the front lights.
Lows: The copper wire for the tow cable is horrid and no internal turret detail other than the machine guns.
Verdict: This is a very well presented model and if you want a T-35 tank this is worth consideration, but I cannot find evidence of an exact match.
  Scale: 1:35
  Mfg. ID: 83844
  Suggested Retail: 49.99
  Related Link: 
  PUBLISHED: May 31, 2016
  NATIONALITY: Russia
NETWORK-WIDE AVERAGE RATINGS
  THIS REVIEWER: 87.05%
  MAKER/PUBLISHER: 83.89%

Our Thanks to Creative Models!
This item was provided by them for the purpose of having it reviewed on this KitMaker Network site. If you would like your kit, book, or product reviewed, please contact us.
View Vendor Homepage  More Reviews  

About Darren Baker (CMOT)
FROM: ENGLAND - SOUTH WEST, UNITED KINGDOM

I have been building model kits since the early 70ís starting with Airfix kits of mostly aircraft, then progressing to the point I am at now building predominantly armour kits from all countries and time periods. Living in the middle of Salisbury plain since the 70ís, I have had lots of opportunitie...

Copyright ©2017 text by Darren Baker [ CMOT ]. Images also by copyright holder unless otherwise noted. Opinions expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of AeroScale. All rights reserved.


Reader Reviews
Do you own this item and want to review it? You can add your review of the item here. Please read the reader review instructions before posting.


Comments

the unofficial title was "landbattleship"
MAY 31, 2016 - 10:42 AM
Darren, what are you talking about here? I thought this kit was suitable to model the last three or four T-35s. I will say I did not go over the minutiae of the tool stowage, however. I'm also confused about: I didn't think kit 83844 had the frame antenna. Kit 83843 had it on sprue M1 but I don't see it in your photos. Are you thinking of the earlier kit? KL
MAY 31, 2016 - 01:08 PM
Sorry Kurt To be clear I could not find any pictorial evidence of a T-35 having been fielded in this exact configuration as the model is indicated to be built. Yes you could do some versions as fielded, but you would need the aerial assembly for that from what I can see. So what i was trying to say is that all of the versions previously released would seem to cover the vehicles that were built.
MAY 31, 2016 - 07:02 PM
Well, here's what I've found . . . Kit 83843 is fine for modeling the first three or four M1939 vehicles. These vehicles all had side skirts with trapezoidal access hatches, a turret base with vertical end faces, and a two-piece rectangular driver's hatch. Only one of these had the frame aerial. Some number of these had the disk idler instead of the spoked type, but neither Hobby Boss kit has these but I didn't consider this omission to be a deal breaker. Kit 83844 is fine for the last three or four tanks that featured side skirts with rectangular access hatches, a turret base with sloped end faces, and a one-piece oval driver's hatch. None of these had a frame aerial and I think all might have had disk idlers. This kit has both types of late side skirts but don't use the trapezoidal hatch versions. You can use these with kit 83842 to represent the odd cylindrical hatch tank refitted with this skirt type. These two kits have nearly all the same sprues, the difference being: 83843 has M1 (frame antenna, vertical turret base ends) and S (night fighting light lenses) 83844 has N (rectangular hatch side skirts, oval driver's hatch, sloped turret base ends) At least that's what I got from my research, which admittedly did not get into the intricacies of tool stowage and ignored the disk idler omission. What was the combination of features on the 83844 kit that seemed improper, Darren? KL
JUN 01, 2016 - 03:23 PM
Thank you for the additional information Kurt. I did not find the information you have presented and so based my opinion on what I did manage to find out.
JUN 01, 2016 - 07:36 PM
Thanks for good information. This is my challenging subject.
JUN 02, 2016 - 03:38 PM
Tip: Just hit enter to submit your reply!
   

What's Your Opinion?


Photos
Click image to enlarge
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move
  • move