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First Look Review
148
Junkers D.I
When Donkeys Flew! - The world's first all-metal fighter
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by: Stephen T. Lawson [ JACKFLASH ]

Roden has given us a great all-plastic basic kit at a fine price. No brass photoetch, but most average modelers need a basic all plastic kit with little rigging like this to have as a premier build. Prof. Hugo Junkers literally went through his own private hell climbing over the mountain of nay-sayers that would tell him. That to ". . .get to the place where you can build a successful all metal aircraft , well you can't get there from here. . ."

Beginning with the Junkers J.1 started on the 8 June 1915 and finally finding some success in the J.9 at its roll out at the end of April 1918. There were never more than 12 machines at the front until the end of the war. It was post war that production literally took off and the main production of Junkers "Tin Donkeys" really went into high gear.

Roden's product development people had a simlar challenge when it came to reproducing a scale model of the Junker's first production line fighter. The surfaces are all compound curves. Their own development took about as long to get the surfaces right. While previously other companies have tried their hand at the project in 1/72 & 1/48 it was the new generation of software that gave Roden the edge. This all plastic kit fills a hole in the ranks of types that deserve to be represented. While starting this preview I began to clean up the sprues. Doing the basics it took about an hour and fifteen minutes. Then I spent a good deal of time appreciating the detail that has been molded into all of the surfaces.

Some comments have been made about the kit provided turtledeck. Here is my preliminary research on the subject. The early Junker D.I (Jco) - parent company, had a two part turtledeck where the corrugations travel from the vertical side panels, they taper into the center seam. On the production Junker D.Is (Jfa) - Fokker built, the turtledeck was one piece and the corrugations were parallel to the line of flight. The CL.I (Jfa) two seaters were that way too.

Some parts are so close to scale it is impressive. If they fit as good as they look this kit will literally fall together. The surface details are not overscaled to the point of distraction but will make a very pleasing contrast to its wood and linen cousins in your displays. Now for the build. Lets see if I can get this tin donkey to fly.
SUMMARY
Highs: Super surface detail matching the original. Inscale appearance most impressive.
Lows: Stress points holding fragile in scale parts must be carefully cut free from the surrounding plastic trees
Verdict: She looks like a honey right out of the box.
Percentage Rating
95%
  Scale: 1:48
  Mfg. ID: #434
  Suggested Retail: $29.69 USD
  Related Link: 
  PUBLISHED: Nov 11, 2007
  NATIONALITY: Germany
NETWORK-WIDE AVERAGE RATINGS
  THIS REVIEWER: 90.97%
  MAKER/PUBLISHER: 86.97%

Our Thanks to Roden!
This item was provided by them for the purpose of having it reviewed on this KitMaker Network site. If you would like your kit, book, or product reviewed, please contact us.

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About Stephen T. Lawson (JackFlash)
FROM: COLORADO, UNITED STATES

I was building Off topic jet age kits at the age of 7. I remember building my first WWI kit way back in 1964-5 at the age of 8-9. Hundreds of 1/72 scale Revell and Airfix kits later my eyes started to change and I wanted to do more detail. With the advent of DML / Dragon and Eduard I sold off my ...

Copyright 2019 text by Stephen T. Lawson [ JACKFLASH ]. Images also by copyright holder unless otherwise noted. Opinions expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of AeroScale. All rights reserved.



Comments

Here is abit of fun for the underside details.
JAN 18, 2009 - 05:06 PM
Hi Stephen, Superb job! The extra work you've put into this project really adds a lot to the model I hope you will publish it as a build feature for Aeroscale... Jean-Luc
JAN 18, 2009 - 06:59 PM
I like it.....a lot!!!! About the long fuselage version, check this link Stephen: Click Here.
JAN 18, 2009 - 09:18 PM
"His first assignment." "Son, if I were only 25 years younger."
JAN 27, 2009 - 06:35 PM
Hello Stephen, very nice to read this on line built. Actually today I started to have a go at his kit myself (the short fuselage version). I do have one question: I have been looking at your first built and at Brad's. Bith seem to be colored grey inside, while you second built looks to be aluminium (that's also what Roden suggests). What is the best option? Cheers, Nico
FEB 14, 2009 - 09:41 AM
Hey there Nico - the grey that I painted on my Junkers interior is somewhat conjetural on the basis that there may have been some paint on the interior for corrosion protection. Alas I don't have much proof for this, and there are good arguements either way. I say go with what you think looks best BC
FEB 14, 2009 - 11:38 AM
For me the interior of the first was based on the fact that a prototype had already been accepted. Even though they were at Adlershof these were Jfa machines that were ready for service. The J.9/1 and J.9/2 were Jco prototypes. The interior for the J.9 (I hope) was like the other Jco J.7 "bare metal." At least according to the recent Datafile 131. And should be corrugated,
FEB 14, 2009 - 04:02 PM
Allright, thanks for the quick response (as always). I will take my benefit. Cheers, Nico
FEB 14, 2009 - 09:48 PM
Another beauty showed up last night. Long fuselage kit #433.
APR 09, 2009 - 11:00 AM
   

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