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Armor/AFV: Techniques
From Weathering to making tent rolls, discuss it here.
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weld beads and flame cuts
PeterW
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England - South East, United Kingdom
Joined: January 11, 2006
KitMaker: 30 posts
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Posted: Thursday, September 02, 2010 - 11:09 PM UTC
As the title suggests what is/are the best way to produce both on model?

I am thinking for the weld beads of using Miliput, rolling it into a fine sausage and applying then using a tool of some description to produce the texture.

But I just don't know.

Peter.
alanmac
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United Kingdom
Joined: February 25, 2007
KitMaker: 2,971 posts
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Posted: Friday, September 03, 2010 - 12:04 AM UTC
Hi Peter

Lots of info on the web site. Check out the tabs along the top, FEATURES, takes you to a wealth of knowledge and advice.

Here is one on your chosen subject. Hope it helps.

http://www.armorama.com/modules.php?op=modload&name=Sections&file=index&req=viewarticle&artid=220

Alan
PeterW
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England - South East, United Kingdom
Joined: January 11, 2006
KitMaker: 30 posts
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Posted: Friday, September 03, 2010 - 01:02 AM UTC
Alan,

Bingo, exactly what I have been looking for.

Thank you,

Peter.
Bratushka
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Indiana, United States
Joined: May 09, 2008
KitMaker: 1,019 posts
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Posted: Friday, September 03, 2010 - 01:06 AM UTC
For flame cuts I have used a piece of stretched sprue glued to the edge that is going to have the cut. I let it dry and then sand it flat to match the mating surface. I then lay on a thick layer of glue on the edge and let it sit a few minutes to soften the plastic up. Taking one of those small saw blades that fit in an X-Acto knife handle and is about the size of the No 11 blade, I tap the soft plastic perpendicular to the bead. I'll pull the blade up and down a little bit, not enough to cut but enough to where the teeth grab the soft plastic and pull it up and down a minute amount.

The tapping action I can best describe doing as you would drumming with a pencil, light and fast and randomly over the edge until it's done from end to end rather than working from one side the other. It produces a nice, irregular, flame cut effect. The way the plastic blobs here and there and is deeper in some spots than others add to the effect.

I figure this kind of thing was done under less than ideal circumstances and the guys wielding the torches weren't always the most skilled at it. The times I have done it captures that look pretty well IMHO. I suppose using stretched sprue may not always be necessary, but I think since some plastic gets softer faster it lends itself to this process better than the kit's plastic. Maybe the plastic becomes more malleable after heating and stretching, I'm not certain. It may even be that the layer where the sprue is glued to the model is harder and prevents the saw blade from digging too deeply.

I haven't done many weld beads, but the few I have done I used essentially the same technique with stretched sprue softened with glue. I use a pogo pin to get the knocked over stack of coins effect. Here's a link to some pictures I posted of them here: http://www.armorama.com/modules.php?op=modload&name=SquawkBox&file=index&req=viewtopic&topic_id=10571&ord=&page=2

In the first picture the one that is second from the right has that formed tail made to lay a wire in and solder it is perfect. Scroll down for a closeup picture. I made a handle from an old paint brush to make a tool. They come in different sizes as well. The weld seam I would make working from one end to the other. I imagine one could shape a piece of brass tubing the same way. I just had a lot of these laying around so they were free which is always the best price!

I never tried the resin ones Archer Fine Transfers make and sell although I have heard good things about them.
SdAufKla
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South Carolina, United States
Joined: May 07, 2010
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Posted: Friday, September 03, 2010 - 01:59 AM UTC
For long, straight welds, I use two pieces of blue painter's tape (cut thin on a piece of glass) laid parrallel on ether side of the weld. I fill the space between with thinned Squadron Green Putty (thinned with acetone and liquid cement). I put the thinne putty down with a cheap, nylon-bristle paint brush (easy to clean).

After the putty skins over, I use a toothpick (cocktail stick) with one end carved to a chisle shape, dipped in acetone, to "chop" along the weld and create the texture. I then peel up the tape, and apply a bit of thinner along the weld to soften the edges and blend it some.

Sounds like a lot of work, but it's actually very fast and easy!

For small welds or welds along tight corners or at the bottoms of small PE parts, I use Milliput two-part epoxy. After mixing, I roll thin "worms", chop the worm into a short piece (the length of the desired weld), apply it to the model, then use the same toothpick (wetted with ordinary water) to chop and texture the weld. Also, fast and easy.

Here's a photo of some on my Firefly:



And the same kinds of welds after base-coating:



For torch-cut edges, I simply use a triangle file to make a series of closely-spaced grooves along the edge and soften it with liquid cement. Again, fast, simple, and gives good results.

For wide welds, just allow the first puttly weld to dry, the repeat with additional welds running adjacent and parrallel to the first one for as wide as you need.

Works for me, anyways.

Mike
PeterW
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England - South East, United Kingdom
Joined: January 11, 2006
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Posted: Friday, September 03, 2010 - 09:22 AM UTC
Thank you for the help chaps. I now know the direction I need to take.

Peter.
Big-John
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Ohio, United States
Joined: August 12, 2010
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Posted: Friday, September 03, 2010 - 09:34 AM UTC
For torch-cut edges, I simply use a triangle file to make a series of closely-spaced grooves along the edge and soften it with liquid cement. Again, fast, simple, and gives good results.
Quoted Text

put quote text here



I also use the triangle file, but never tried softening the plastic before. Use the file to cut Irregular grooves in the edge you want to simulate.

I was watching some raw footage on youtube of the 3Rd AD making the hedge choppers, and some of the peices were crooked as a dogs hind leg.
panzerdoc
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Alaska, United States
Joined: August 22, 2010
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Posted: Thursday, October 14, 2010 - 05:55 AM UTC
Sorry for the late reply. Thought you might find some of the weld seams and flame cuts in this build of interest. I predominantly use apoxy clay for weld seams but used the archer transfers for the welds around the mortised joints on this jagdtiger.

http://tankrats.kitmaker.net/modules.php?op=modload&name=SquawkBox&file=index&req=viewtopic&topic_id=163710&page=1
Biggles2
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Quebec, Canada
Joined: January 01, 2004
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Posted: Friday, February 04, 2011 - 09:21 AM UTC
I've used the Archer welds and they are fast and easy, but...they are not flexible enough to make curved weld seams, are too uniform and perfect, and the flow marks are V shaped and should be rounded. I prefer the stretched sprue and glue method. Even though its more time consuming, the result is more realistic.
Bratushka
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Indiana, United States
Joined: May 09, 2008
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Posted: Friday, February 04, 2011 - 10:59 AM UTC

Quoted Text

I've used the Archer welds and they are fast and easy, but...they are not flexible enough to make curved weld seams, are too uniform and perfect, and the flow marks are V shaped and should be rounded. I prefer the stretched sprue and glue method. Even though its more time consuming, the result is more realistic.



Great minds think alike!

Somebody else posted about using a triangular file. I tried that ages ago when I was into cars, especially vintage dirt track oval racers where they just cut up a regular car and weren't too concerned about making things pretty or even. The notches , no matter how irregular i tried to space them or how lightly it tried to use them could just never replicate the blobs and spatters and irregularities of the stretched sprue heavily softened with glue and manipulated with jagged type tools like the X-acto saw blades i mentioned in my post above.

I never though about the inflexibility of the Archer weld seams. That's a good point! I have used their rivets and once you get the hang of them, they are OK. I wish they made some bigger ones like what were used on the turret of an FT-17 tank turret. Those are some hefty rivets but I have seen similar sized ones used on other things.