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Military history and past events only. Rants or inflamitory comments will be removed.
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Capt. Ed Freeman
JackFlash
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Colorado, United States
Joined: January 25, 2004
KitMaker: 11,649 posts
AeroScale: 10,991 posts
Posted: Sunday, July 08, 2012 - 03:58 PM UTC

You ever hear of Captain Ed Freeman? CMOH winner from the Vietnam war. Flew into a hot LZ -X 14 times wounded 4 during the efforts. He retrieved 29 men.

"Your unit is outnumbered 8-1 and the enemy fire is so intense from 100 yards away, that your CO (commanding officer) has ordered the helicopters to stop coming in.

You're lying there, listening to the enemy machine guns and you know you're not getting out.

Your family is half way around the world, 12,000 miles away, and you'll never see them again.

As the world starts to fade in and out, you know this is the day.

Then - over the machine gun noise - you faintly hear that sound of a helicopter. You look up to see a Huey coming in. But.. It doesn't seem real because no MedEvac markings are on it.

Captain Ed Freeman is coming in for you.

He's not MedEvac so it's not his job, but he heard the radio call and decided he's flying his Huey down into the machine gun fire anyway. Even after the MedEvacs were ordered not to come. He's coming anyway. . ."

". . .On November 14, 1965, Freeman and his unit transported a battalion of American soldiers to the Ia Drang Valley. Later, after arriving back at base, they learned that the soldiers had come under intense fire and had taken heavy casualties. Enemy fire around the landing zones was so heavy that the landing zone was closed to medical evacuation helicopters. Freeman and his commander, Major Bruce Crandall, volunteered to fly their unarmed, lightly armored UH-1 Huey in support of the embattled troops. Freeman made a total of fourteen trips to the battlefield, bringing in water and ammunition and taking out wounded soldiers under heavy enemy fire in what was later named the Battle of Ia Drang. By the time they landed their heavily damaged Huey, Captain Freeman had been wounded four times by ground fire. . ."

". . .Then he flies you up and out through the gunfire to the doctors and nurses and safety.

And, he kept coming back!! 13 more times!! Until all the wounded were out. No one knew until the mission was over that the Captain had been hit 4 times in the legs and left arm. He took 29 men out that day. Most not have made it without the Captain and his Huey.

Medal of Honor Recipient, Captain Ed Freeman, United States Air Force, died 2008 at the age of 70, in Boise, Idaho. . ."

On Nov. 14, 1965 heros may have been flesh & blood, but were also steely eyed soldiers who knew their duties.

Here is a bit more.
Tankrider
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Oklahoma, United States
Joined: October 07, 2002
KitMaker: 1,240 posts
AeroScale: 0 posts
Posted: Friday, August 17, 2012 - 06:11 AM UTC
Stephen,
Informative but Major Freeman was a member of the US Army, not Air Force.

Thanks for remembering this hero

John Charvat