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Armor/AFV: Allied - WWII
Armor and ground forces of the Allied forces during World War II.
Hosted by Darren Baker
Mirror Models' Diamond T Wrecker
165thspc
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Kentucky, United States
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Posted: Friday, July 18, 2014 - 09:19 AM UTC
Thanks Frenchy!
165thspc
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Kentucky, United States
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Posted: Friday, July 18, 2014 - 09:21 AM UTC
Another close up of the jake leg assembly and the running board mounted fire extingusher:


(Photo - Jim Falconer Collection)
165thspc
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Kentucky, United States
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Posted: Saturday, July 19, 2014 - 02:33 AM UTC
Check out that tool box way up on top of the Holmes wrecker frame. Might have to add that to my T! It would offer the spot lights some additional protection from getting hit but I would hate to have to get into that tool box with any frequency!

easyco69
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Ontario, Canada
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Posted: Saturday, July 19, 2014 - 03:31 AM UTC
Are they a small company? First time offering's? That's probably why the price is high? Just starting out.
Goes for the craftsmanship too, it'll probably get better as they go along.
A little check on the history of the company & an understanding of their first time on the market would justify all the misgiving's , for me anyway.
I wouldn't put my $ down if I didn't have faith in the product.
These little company's just want to be on the market with the big boys, it's the only way they can compete. If you understand that then you shouldn't have a problem slapping the "dough" down. Especially when they offer a rare subject as the Diamond T-Wrecker.
Take Tamiya for example...I would be furious if I bought a Diamond T-Wrecker from them after they been around for 30+ yrs & in the box is a hammer, chisel & a block of wood.
easyco69
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Posted: Saturday, July 19, 2014 - 03:46 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Another close up of the jake leg assembly and the running board mounted fire extingusher:


(Photo - Jim Falconer Collection)


What color would that be painted? The fire extinguisher
165thspc
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Kentucky, United States
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Posted: Saturday, July 19, 2014 - 07:54 AM UTC
The original photos I find seem to show the fire bottle painted O.D. I am fairly sure any red bottles we see are on modern restored vehicles.
165thspc
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Kentucky, United States
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Posted: Saturday, July 19, 2014 - 02:29 PM UTC
Not sure exactly why we are still talking about the cost of this model. It has been my experience that prices seem to have now settled to around $60 plus shipping.

What I have also found is that if you care about detail, accuracy and satisfaction then you will have a highly rewarding and precise model for your efforts!
Taylornic
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Tennessee, United States
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Posted: Saturday, July 19, 2014 - 03:38 PM UTC
Mike, how was the enclosed cab to build?
165thspc
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Kentucky, United States
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Posted: Sunday, July 20, 2014 - 04:13 AM UTC
The hard cab builds up fairly easily! The fit is very good and everything is nice and square. One thing that really helps is that the base for the seat cushions forms a 90 degree gusset between the cab floor and the back wall of the cab. I suggest making this your first assembly step. Lots of glue can be added in this unseen area for a solid bond.







The underside of the cab roof is one of the few places where you will find ejector pins marks on this model. I filled these in with a light coating of body filler putty over the entire surface of the ceiling to easily hid these.

165thspc
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Kentucky, United States
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Posted: Sunday, July 20, 2014 - 04:18 AM UTC
A little momentary side trip here:

Yesterday I attended the Keeneland Concours d'Elegance at the Keeneland racecourse in Lexington, Kentucky. I happened across this beautifully restored 1948 Diamond T one ton pickup at the show.
(All photos Mike Koenig)









165thspc
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Posted: Sunday, July 20, 2014 - 04:25 AM UTC
(Again all photos copyright Mike Koenig 2014)













165thspc
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Kentucky, United States
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Posted: Wednesday, July 23, 2014 - 11:21 PM UTC
Sorry guys, no progress on the T this week - celebrating three birthdays this week so lots of family stuff to do after work.
165thspc
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Kentucky, United States
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Posted: Thursday, July 24, 2014 - 01:48 AM UTC




Note location of assorted data plates, ventilator damper in ceiling of cab, (open oval cut out is glove box) and the four equalizers needed to support the two-part opening front windshield. (As far as I know the hand cranks to open the front windshields were limited to only the civilian Diamond T trucks.)

Additional note: Notice the lever handle just to the left of the auxilary gauge hanging under the dash. This lever operated the cowl mounted ventilation damper.
165thspc
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Kentucky, United States
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Posted: Friday, July 25, 2014 - 02:00 AM UTC
Trying to figure out how to make the booms swivel??? However it may be too late in the construction process for that!

The top beam is no problem but it might be too late for the bottom beam.
165thspc
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Kentucky, United States
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Posted: Saturday, July 26, 2014 - 02:22 PM UTC
From the Paris, Kentucky Farm Machinery Show just today:

1937 Chevy Wrecker with Holmes recovery equipment -



165thspc
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Posted: Sunday, July 27, 2014 - 01:08 PM UTC
165thspc
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Posted: Monday, July 28, 2014 - 05:18 AM UTC
Beautiful Diamond T restoration:

165thspc
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Posted: Monday, July 28, 2014 - 05:36 AM UTC
165thspc
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Kentucky, United States
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Posted: Monday, July 28, 2014 - 10:13 AM UTC
I forgot to mention; you should plan on adding some body filler putty to the vertical sides of the radiator structure. This piece is made up of three sections and just about the only way to create the one-piece smooth metal effect is by using putty and some light sanding.




Above I am showing a similarly constructed radiator on a restored 1937 Farmall tractor.
______________________________________________________________________

Also wanted to share that I covered over the two beams with shim plastic, that show through the deck of the loadbox. Both had a serious sink hole in the plastic molding.

165thspc
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Kentucky, United States
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Posted: Monday, July 28, 2014 - 10:19 AM UTC
One final look at the T's weathered frame before I add the front fenders, gas tanks and running boards. I use pastel chalks for weathering and rarely use a setting overspray because the overspray kills too much of what I consider to be a very pleasing dusty effect.

165thspc
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Kentucky, United States
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Posted: Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - 11:13 AM UTC
Working on the bonnet . . .


and thinning the hinged panels for a proper tight fit.
165thspc
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Kentucky, United States
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Posted: Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - 11:45 AM UTC
Mirror Models suggested representing the interior door handles on the enclosed cab with short pieces of wire. I felt I could do better with small pieces of plastic:



Most photos of restored vehicles show the inside door handles painted O.D. but original construction photos show them as having been stock civilian chrome handles.
165thspc
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Posted: Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - 11:50 AM UTC
Another added detail that I am sure will never be seen again:
- The enclosure for the rear tool box drawer located in the end sill. The bracing under the load box on the model is designed to allow for this feature but no tool box enclosure was included in the kit.

165thspc
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Posted: Wednesday, July 30, 2014 - 12:50 AM UTC
For some reasone the above item is left off every model manufacture's Deuce and a Half though they all should have it.
165thspc
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Posted: Thursday, July 31, 2014 - 09:19 AM UTC
To save a few pennies on the production of the kit of course.

However, as I have said elsewhere, this kit gives you twice or three times the "beef" in the form of complete detail than any two kits from most other hobby manufactures.