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Early Aviation
Discuss World War I and the early years of aviation thru 1934.
Hosted by Rowan Baylis
Has anyone ever built a model of this?
maxmwill
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Alabama, United States
Joined: August 24, 2011
KitMaker: 297 posts
AeroScale: 262 posts
Posted: Thursday, January 12, 2017 - 12:43 PM UTC
I have those.

And I did a google search, and couldn't find enough to help with building, but at this point, I have a pretty good idea as to how to get this started, with the internal structure, then build from there.

I plan on making the forward fuselage from fiberglass over a foam form. The one thing I'm having difficult figuring out is out the fabric covering on the aft fuselage, though.
Berwickboy
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England - East Midlands, United Kingdom
Joined: April 27, 2013
KitMaker: 375 posts
AeroScale: 313 posts
Posted: Wednesday, January 11, 2017 - 08:33 AM UTC
A quick net search reveals this page http://www.aviastar.org/pictures/england/vickers_vulcan.gif which has a 3 view drawing and an interior drawing. There are also a number of articles here http://aviadejavu.ru/Site/Arts/Art7343.htm You can also find quite a lot of pictures just doing a Google search for the Vickers Vulcan
CaptnTommy
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Connecticut, United States
Joined: October 26, 2009
KitMaker: 326 posts
AeroScale: 300 posts
Posted: Wednesday, January 11, 2017 - 01:55 AM UTC
The last time I saw this airplane a friend in work was building a Peanut Scale (11 inch wing span) flyer. sorry no photo and it was 1985.

Out standing Model and flight.

Captn Tommy
maxmwill
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Alabama, United States
Joined: August 24, 2011
KitMaker: 297 posts
AeroScale: 262 posts
Posted: Tuesday, January 10, 2017 - 12:25 PM UTC
I had originally wanted to build a 1/48 scale model of a flying boat design I found in a recently published book, "Beyond the Spitfire: the unseen designs of RJ Mitchell". The flying boat was to have a gull wing, sponsons, and four Goshawks, with the inlet for the radiator being the entire leading edge. It was also to have the COW gun. This was Type 232, and was a proposal for a patrol/recce aircraft. While no dimensions were given, I guesstimate that it would have been roughly the size of a Lancaster or similar. While it was never even considered seriously(due to the choice of engine), it still tickled me a bit, as I have a soft spot in my heart for gull wings(except the Corsair. Don't count me as a fan) and flying boats with sponsons, so I'd been considering it as a scratch build project.

However, I wasn't so sure about my relative skill level, yet, as far as scratch building is concerned. Hence the choice of the Vulcan. Since then, I've been trying to find pointers and techniques, and things finally got going when I happened upon a copy of Meng with a multi-part build article of a 1/48 Stirling. I've learned quite a bit from the series, having ordered the other parts(it is no yet finished), and getting points from them.

The Vulcan is a bit simpler than the Stirling, and there aren't as many details as the Stirling has, so I think this might not only be a lot of fun, but a learning experience. Now, the only thing I have to get more information on is rigging, which shouldn't be much of a difficulty.
maxmwill
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Alabama, United States
Joined: August 24, 2011
KitMaker: 297 posts
AeroScale: 262 posts
Posted: Saturday, January 07, 2017 - 10:18 AM UTC
Well, the Vulcan wasn't what I wanted to scratch; it was a Supermarine Type 232 patrol/recon four engine flying boat that never left the paper stage. However, as I continued to look at it, with the goal in mind of scratch building, I began to realize that I didn't have enough experience for such a large aircraft(while there are no measurements listed, it looks to be about the size of a Sunderland or similar), so I put nailed the plans to the shop wall and began to consider something else, hence the Vulcan, which I've always had a soft spot for.

The 232 is in a book that was just recently published, "Beyond the Spitfire: the unseen designs of RJ Mitchell", and covers those designs of his which were never built. There are many other types which could be modelled, and it covers aspects about Mitchell and his designs much better than before.
JPTRR
Staff MemberManaging Editor
RAILROAD MODELING
#051
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Tennessee, United States
Joined: December 21, 2002
KitMaker: 6,570 posts
AeroScale: 2,821 posts
Posted: Saturday, January 07, 2017 - 09:48 AM UTC
I think you should scratch build a 1/32 Bristol Brabazon.

Looking forward to any work you make on the Vulcan.
JClapp
#259
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Massachusetts, United States
Joined: October 23, 2011
KitMaker: 1,870 posts
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Posted: Saturday, January 07, 2017 - 09:37 AM UTC
I'm sure you have seen all that Google can turn up,
but I like the technical drawings this guy has collected
http://aviadejavu.ru/Site/Crafts/Craft33111.htm

and
maxmwill
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Alabama, United States
Joined: August 24, 2011
KitMaker: 297 posts
AeroScale: 262 posts
Posted: Saturday, January 07, 2017 - 08:48 AM UTC
Welp, in the book, Vickers Aircraft since 1908, there is a fairly detailed history of it, along with a few photos and a nice 3 view. It can be found on page 105.
rdt1953
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New Jersey, United States
Joined: February 06, 2015
KitMaker: 373 posts
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Posted: Thursday, January 05, 2017 - 01:05 AM UTC
Perhaps a partially deflated football would make a good start -

I'd love to see it done - go for it! Richard
JClapp
#259
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Massachusetts, United States
Joined: October 23, 2011
KitMaker: 1,870 posts
AeroScale: 1,405 posts
Posted: Thursday, January 05, 2017 - 12:08 AM UTC
haha! had never heard of it, but I agree it is wonderful!

I hope you can build a model, Id love to see it done
maxmwill
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Alabama, United States
Joined: August 24, 2011
KitMaker: 297 posts
AeroScale: 262 posts
Posted: Wednesday, January 04, 2017 - 12:28 PM UTC
I've begun research on a possible project, a scratch built 1/48 scale model of a Vickers Vulcan,a failed airliner design, but did teach a lot of needed lessons in airliner construction and other aspects the industry now takes for granted.

Ever since I first saw a photo of one, I have been in love with that tubby lady.

And so, I am now curious as to whether or not someone else tackled this, as I wouldn't mind borrowing a few pointers, as well as admiring someone else's effort with this relatively obscure early airliner effort.

In case anyone is curious, this was designed around 1922.