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Tools & Supplies: Compressors
Talk about compressors.
Hosted by Matt Leese
Compressor for H&S Infinity
RKrebs
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Washington, United States
Joined: November 27, 2015
KitMaker: 13 posts
AeroScale: 0 posts
Posted: Sunday, August 20, 2017 - 01:24 PM GMT+7
I am in the process of upgrading my airbrush. i currently have, what was my first airbrush, a Master Airbrush with a single piston compressor. My question is this.....is the cheap compressor going to work on with the H&S brush? I will upgrade the compressor at some point, but after dropping $320 in the airbrush I don't want to purchase the compressor yet.

Thanks in advance.
Kevlar06
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Washington, United States
Joined: March 15, 2009
KitMaker: 1,336 posts
AeroScale: 330 posts
Posted: Sunday, August 20, 2017 - 01:38 PM GMT+7
Your Harder and Steenbeck airbrush should work with just about any hobby compressor. But I'd stay away from cheap compressors that are sold by stores like Harbor Freight, also be careful of the "industrial grade" compressors from Lowes or Home Depot, unless you can find a regulator to match that will allow you to lower the air pressure from 4-5 PSI to about 70 PSI max. Any lower PSI and you won't get the full range of paint effects, and any higher PSI may cause problems in the brush or in the compressor-- to include stoppages and blown seals. I was at HD yesterday, and noted many of theirs went as high as 200 PSI-- and not many went below 10 PSI. Regulators can be found at various hobby compressor companies-- I use a Micro-Mark regulator.
VR, Russ
RKrebs
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Washington, United States
Joined: November 27, 2015
KitMaker: 13 posts
AeroScale: 0 posts
Posted: Sunday, August 20, 2017 - 02:23 PM GMT+7

Quoted Text

Your Harder and Steenbeck airbrush should work with just about any hobby compressor. But I'd stay away from cheap compressors that are sold by stores like Harbor Freight, also be careful of the "industrial grade" compressors from Lowes or Home Depot, unless you can find a regulator to match that will allow you to lower the air pressure from 4-5 PSI to about 70 PSI max. Any lower PSI and you won't get the full range of paint effects, and any higher PSI may cause problems in the brush or in the compressor-- to include stoppages and blown seals. I was at HD yesterday, and noted many of theirs went as high as 200 PSI-- and not many went below 10 PSI. Regulators can be found at various hobby compressor companies-- I use a Micro-Mark regulator.
VR, Russ



Thank you Russ. It looks like my compressor will work ok. At some point in the new future I will upgrade to a better compressor. I also may just add a tank to this compressor for better more even flow of air and use that until the compressor goes and then buy a better compressor.
Scarred
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Washington, United States
Joined: March 11, 2016
KitMaker: 514 posts
AeroScale: 19 posts
Posted: Sunday, August 20, 2017 - 03:51 PM GMT+7
I use the same air compressor for air brushing that I use for running my rattle gun and other air tools. It has a big tank, runs over 175 psi and I got it from home depot. You don't need a special compressor to run an airbrush, you just have to be able to control the air flow accurately at lower pressures. I have a regulator on my paint desk that I use for my airbrush with a max of 100 psi, it connects to my compressor via 50ft of hose. I set the regulator at the compressor end between 80-100 psi and regulator at the airbrush end allows me work in lower psi's with more accuracy. Works great, just make sure you get a water trap.
Kevlar06
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Washington, United States
Joined: March 15, 2009
KitMaker: 1,336 posts
AeroScale: 330 posts
Posted: Sunday, August 20, 2017 - 04:41 PM GMT+7
Yep-- you can do that, but as I said regulation is everything-- the higher PSI offered by 200 PSI industrial compressors will increase wear on both the compressor and the hobby airbrush seals and valves unless you can step the PSI down with a regulator-- and the regulators that come on the industrial types usually are for higher pressures. It sounds like Patrick has reduced the pressure with a long hose and another regulator. I did forget to mention the moisture trap-- a necessity here in Washington. You should also plan on draining a tank compressor if you have one-- most good ones have a drain in the bottom of the tank. We model builders often forget this, but the moisture being compressed has to go someplace-- and that's the bottom of the tank, where it increases wear on the compressor and sits until it rusts a hole through the tank. Take it from experience. By the way, JB Weld works great for patching holes in compressors-- don't ask how I know.
VR, Russ
RKrebs
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Washington, United States
Joined: November 27, 2015
KitMaker: 13 posts
AeroScale: 0 posts
Posted: Monday, August 21, 2017 - 07:30 AM GMT+7
Thank guys. I figured the industrial compressor would work just fine given you have a regulator for lower pressures. My concern was more in that the compressor I have now doesn't have a tank (something I may have to remedy soon)and if it would be enough to adequately power the airbrush. The compressor constantly cycles on and off at low pressures.
RobinNilsson
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Stockholm, Sweden
Joined: November 29, 2006
KitMaker: 2,536 posts
AeroScale: 0 posts
Posted: Monday, August 21, 2017 - 08:29 AM GMT+7

Quoted Text

Thank guys. I figured the industrial compressor would work just fine given you have a regulator for lower pressures. My concern was more in that the compressor I have now doesn't have a tank (something I may have to remedy soon)and if it would be enough to adequately power the airbrush. The compressor constantly cycles on and off at low pressures.




Getting a tank will allow the compressor to run for a longer period until the pressure switch shuts it off and then the compressor can rest until you have used enough air (or rather pressure) from the tank. Getting hold of a tank could be another matter though.

I am planning to replace the (rusted through) tank on my compressor with tanks made from two fire extinguishers, the powder type. According to the specifications they were factory filled and tested to a lot higher pressure than my compressor can deliver.
A larger tank means that you can work for longer periods before the compressor starts up again. If the tank is too large your compressor will run until it overheats.
A car tire (or rather complete wheel) could work as tank as well, as long as it is not too big ....

/ Robin
Scarred
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Washington, United States
Joined: March 11, 2016
KitMaker: 514 posts
AeroScale: 19 posts
Posted: Monday, August 21, 2017 - 10:10 AM GMT+7
I was able to get a CUCV spare to power my airbrush while I was looking for a compressor. Had to explain it to my battalion commander on an inspection as to why one of his wheels was stashed in my room. He caught on quick and thought it was ingenious.
RKrebs
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Washington, United States
Joined: November 27, 2015
KitMaker: 13 posts
AeroScale: 0 posts
Posted: Wednesday, August 23, 2017 - 12:13 PM GMT+7

Quoted Text

I was able to get a CUCV spare to power my airbrush while I was looking for a compressor. Had to explain it to my battalion commander on an inspection as to why one of his wheels was stashed in my room. He caught on quick and thought it was ingenious.



Interesting....although even if my wife was ok with me keeping an old tire in the house, I am not sure I would want an old tire in my house. :-)

Semper Fi.
Scarred
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Washington, United States
Joined: March 11, 2016
KitMaker: 514 posts
AeroScale: 19 posts
Posted: Wednesday, August 23, 2017 - 04:04 PM GMT+7

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

I was able to get a CUCV spare to power my airbrush while I was looking for a compressor. Had to explain it to my battalion commander on an inspection as to why one of his wheels was stashed in my room. He caught on quick and thought it was ingenious.



Interesting....although even if my wife was ok with me keeping an old tire in the house, I am not sure I would want an old tire in my house. :-)

Semper Fi.



I did wash it. Perhaps I should have spit shined the rubber and used edge dressing on the lettering.