login   |    register
General Aircraft
This forum is for general aircraft modelling discussions.
Hosted by Kevin Brant
Dropping Flaps
Tin_Can
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Florida, United States
Joined: January 26, 2002
KitMaker: 1,560 posts
AeroScale: 750 posts
Posted: Monday, March 04, 2002 - 09:20 PM UTC
Does anybody know of a good tutorial on dropping flaps on a plane? Also, do the better kits (tamiya, hasegawa) come with droppable flaps standard or do you still have to do some cutting? Thanks.
Sabot
Joined: December 18, 2001
KitMaker: 12,584 posts
AeroScale: 287 posts
Posted: Monday, March 04, 2002 - 09:27 PM UTC
The Osprey Modelling Compendum of either the basic or advance aviation modelling shows how to do this. I'll take a look when I get home and see which manual it was in. Also naming a brand is difficult since separate flaps are an item coming around again and are usually pointed out in reviews. An older XYZ kit may not have them, but a newer kit by the same manufacturer may have them. Old Airfix, Monogram and Revell kits came with moving control surfaces way back then.
Tin_Can
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Florida, United States
Joined: January 26, 2002
KitMaker: 1,560 posts
AeroScale: 750 posts
Posted: Monday, March 04, 2002 - 09:28 PM UTC
Thanks Rob.
HunterCottage
#116
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Stockholm, Sweden
Joined: December 19, 2001
KitMaker: 1,717 posts
AeroScale: 139 posts
Posted: Monday, March 04, 2002 - 09:54 PM UTC
Its a lot like opening a hatch on a tank (except the hatch wouldn't give you more lift )

You basically work with the parts together and cut them off the model. Then you add what ever you need. As long as you have reference material, there isn't any problem. Really nothing more to it...

I have a P-38 and a P-51 that I intend to doctor up a little, but that doesn't help you now. (In reality I don't know when I'll get around to it...)
HunterCottage
#116
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Stockholm, Sweden
Joined: December 19, 2001
KitMaker: 1,717 posts
AeroScale: 139 posts
Posted: Monday, March 04, 2002 - 10:15 PM UTC
I did some looking around and David W. Aungst has little part of dropping the flaps in his article F14A Tomcat - PART THREE. Go to features and to the article.

Most aircraft don't still have very much detail in these areas. Then again I build mostly 1/72. The larger scales offer much more opportunities.
screamingeagle
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Connecticut, United States
Joined: January 08, 2002
KitMaker: 1,027 posts
AeroScale: 0 posts
Posted: Monday, March 04, 2002 - 10:18 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Does anybody know of a good tutorial on dropping flaps on a plane? Also, do the better kits (tamiya, hasegawa) come with droppable flaps standard or do you still have to do some cutting? Thanks.



Hi TC, - in FSM March issue, there is an article on the old classic model
"THE SEA VENOM", by Paul Romans. - He gives instruction w/photo's
of how to drop the flaps. - I'm sure it would be a good basic reference
for your needs of " how to " in general.
- ralph
GeneralFailure
_VISITCOMMUNITY
European Union
Joined: February 15, 2002
KitMaker: 2,289 posts
AeroScale: 0 posts
Posted: Monday, March 04, 2002 - 10:27 PM UTC
Brian, Rob, Bryan,
It takes more to lower the flaps than to just cut them out and swivel them a bit downwards. I suggest you have extra attention next time you fly (and take a window seat behind the wing !). You'll notice that these flaps do not only lower; they also extend. They are held by a complicated construction of struts and pilons that allows them to extend backwards and downwards, thus increasing the total surface of the wing to allow lift at reduced speed. Each aircraft type is different, though the basics are the same. I suggest you look for a picture of a landing aircraft of the correct type to see the correct construction of the flap extension bits (all those parts have technical names I do not even know in Dutch, so you'll have to do with "bits" :-)

I suggest you try this whole extension thing on an older model first, before you mess around with an expensive new kit !

Modeling a landing aircraft with extended/lowered flaps / slats is not easily done, but when you succeed it's mighty impressive ! No wonder it's rarely seen done correctly ! It would allow you to show a diorama of touchdown wiht the main gear on ground while the nosewheel is still up... or the intricate cable systems for carrier landing with detailed deck.... mmmmm good !




Jan
HunterCottage
#116
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Stockholm, Sweden
Joined: December 19, 2001
KitMaker: 1,717 posts
AeroScale: 139 posts
Posted: Monday, March 04, 2002 - 10:47 PM UTC
Yes Jan it is more complecated than I stated, but having done it before, it still isn't a big deal...with the right reference material that is...
Tin_Can
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Florida, United States
Joined: January 26, 2002
KitMaker: 1,560 posts
AeroScale: 750 posts
Posted: Monday, March 04, 2002 - 11:11 PM UTC
Guys, thx for the replies and Jan I concur that there is a lot to dropping the flaps. I didn't mean to ensenuate that there wasn't. It's just something that I've seen that makes a plane 'standout' when you see that kind of detail.
HunterCottage
#116
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Stockholm, Sweden
Joined: December 19, 2001
KitMaker: 1,717 posts
AeroScale: 139 posts
Posted: Monday, March 04, 2002 - 11:16 PM UTC
No, Bryan I put my foot in my mouth...
Sabot
Joined: December 18, 2001
KitMaker: 12,584 posts
AeroScale: 287 posts
Posted: Tuesday, March 05, 2002 - 12:01 AM UTC
Never dropped flaps, and probably never will (unless I happen to build an airplane and it happens to have that option and I happen to use the option). Just pointing out where I may have seen an article regarding this and not to rely on a specific brand of model when looking for the flap option. I actually know very little about aircraft, but like to slap one together on occasion.
GeneralFailure
_VISITCOMMUNITY
European Union
Joined: February 15, 2002
KitMaker: 2,289 posts
AeroScale: 0 posts
Posted: Tuesday, March 05, 2002 - 12:12 AM UTC

I certainly want to break your enthusiasm here ! The system of flaps and slats is quite spectacular... a miracle of technology. I really recommend you take notice next time you're landing. Certainly on wide body aircraft (B747, MD11, A340...) this is impressive !
It's a shame most manufacturers neglect the possibility to show this feature, and it leaves a strong impact. I think it takes two or three evenings of modeling to do this properly. That is : if you don't spend half the evening on this website ! Lol !
Have fun with it !

Jan

If at first you don't succeed.... call an airstrike !
Chappy_ju87
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Ohio, United States
Joined: December 01, 2001
KitMaker: 146 posts
AeroScale: 0 posts
Posted: Tuesday, March 05, 2002 - 12:46 AM UTC
The last hasegawa kit I built (Bf-109G-6 "Barkhorn") had the option to drop the flaps. Very nice kit for the money, will be posting pics of it soon.
Sabot
Joined: December 18, 2001
KitMaker: 12,584 posts
AeroScale: 287 posts
Posted: Tuesday, March 05, 2002 - 12:54 AM UTC

Quoted Text

I really recommend you take notice next time you're landing.

Actually I do take note of this on aircraft while flying. I look at a lot of things with both a modeler's eye (weathering, rivets, oils/fluids on wings) and as a maintenance officer (access panels, all fasteners present, location, etc.). I do think the flap operation is interesting as well as how little movement is required out of an aerilon to turn the big jets. Neat stuff. I just don't think I go all out when building an aircraft. I think I'd just do it plain & clean.
HunterCottage
#116
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Stockholm, Sweden
Joined: December 19, 2001
KitMaker: 1,717 posts
AeroScale: 139 posts
Posted: Tuesday, March 05, 2002 - 01:54 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

I really recommend you take notice next time you're landing.

Actually I do take note of this on aircraft while flying. I look at a lot of things with both a modeler's eye (weathering, rivets, oils/fluids on wings) and as a maintenance officer (access panels, all fasteners present, location, etc.). I do think the flap operation is interesting as well as how little movement is required out of an aerilon to turn the big jets. Neat stuff. I just don't think I go all out when building an aircraft. I think I'd just do it plain & clean.



Rob, now you know how intimidating I think armor is!! Yeah, I know...I'm a nut
GeneralFailure
_VISITCOMMUNITY
European Union
Joined: February 15, 2002
KitMaker: 2,289 posts
AeroScale: 0 posts
Posted: Tuesday, March 05, 2002 - 06:57 AM UTC
Well, Rob...
What that spectacular vehicle pool is for you... the airport is for me. I just love to end the day with a little walk on the apron and sniff the jetfuel. Climb on a 747 freighter of just FEEL the aircraft noise through my chest when I stand in front of one when they switch those engines on for pushback !!! mmmm. I'm far from a mechanic, but I know every nook and cranny of those machines after 13 years at the airport ! Another nice thing about it is they often let me fly in the cockpit. That is : if my wife lets me ! She's not to keen to see me leave for the flight deck and be gone for a few hours while she tries to sleep alone in the back
Sabot
Joined: December 18, 2001
KitMaker: 12,584 posts
AeroScale: 287 posts
Posted: Tuesday, March 05, 2002 - 07:32 AM UTC
Bryan, it's the Osprey Modelling Manuals #12, POSTWAR AIRCRAFT, by Rodrigo Cabos that has a nice Tornado F Mk 3 with everything including the kitchen sink hanging out. The Advanced Aviation Modelling probably has more, but I can't find that issue. It's not in the Basic Aviation Modelling manual.
Tin_Can
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Florida, United States
Joined: January 26, 2002
KitMaker: 1,560 posts
AeroScale: 750 posts
Posted: Tuesday, March 05, 2002 - 10:05 AM UTC
Thanks Rob. I'll have to keep my eye out for those two books.