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Armor/AFV: Softskins
Softskins group discussions.
Hosted by Darren Baker
German Motorcycles
yellobelli
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United States
Joined: October 22, 2002
KitMaker: 45 posts
AeroScale: 0 posts
Posted: Thursday, October 31, 2002 - 04:37 AM UTC
First, my apologies if I've posted in the wrong place. Seeing as how they don't have an enclosed cab, I have a hard time rationalizing a way to call motorcycles softskinned, let alone armor. Unfortunately, I didn't know where else to post.

Does anyone know if German motorcycles received special equipment/outfitting for winter use? While I wouldn't want to use one in the snow, I can't imagine that they German army would put aside all of their two/three wheeled vehicles due to some inclement weather.

Does anyone know of any good sites or books with pics of motorcycles being used in ice or snow? Who makes the best 1:35 kit?

Thanks in advance for any information you can provide.
Wolf-Leader
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New Hampshire, United States
Joined: June 06, 2002
KitMaker: 1,220 posts
AeroScale: 55 posts
Posted: Thursday, October 31, 2002 - 04:40 AM UTC
yellobelli,
I have always liked the Tamiya 1/35th motorcycles. #:-)
ukgeoff
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England - North East, United Kingdom
Joined: May 03, 2002
KitMaker: 1,007 posts
AeroScale: 101 posts
Posted: Thursday, October 31, 2002 - 05:13 AM UTC
While I dont know if the Germans winterized their motorcycles, I have found a photo in one of my reference books which may be helpful.



The book in question is Panzers in Russia 1941-43 by Bruce Quarrie, number 9 in the WW2 Photo Album series, (most likely long out of print)
slodder
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North Carolina, United States
Joined: February 22, 2002
KitMaker: 11,718 posts
AeroScale: 305 posts
Posted: Thursday, October 31, 2002 - 05:21 AM UTC
Based on a kit I have from Italeries Prestige series, they did winterize their motorcycles.
The two things I remember with out the kit in front of me are
1. Hand warmer/muffler/mits. They are large canvace/leather pouches that cover the handles all the way in on the bars to the inside of the break levers.
2. They added extra either electrical or liquid warming 'piping/wiring' from the engine to the side car (if equiped).

If you want I can take a look at the kit at home tonight and scan in images of the parts pieces and or instructions to give you an idea on building them.


Wahoooo - That's 300 - Promotion Time !!
ukgeoff
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England - North East, United Kingdom
Joined: May 03, 2002
KitMaker: 1,007 posts
AeroScale: 101 posts
Posted: Thursday, October 31, 2002 - 05:30 AM UTC
I've found another photo, in a second book in the series mentioned in my last post. This one covers the 1943-45 period (series number 12).

AJLaFleche
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Massachusetts, United States
Joined: May 05, 2002
KitMaker: 8,072 posts
AeroScale: 328 posts
Posted: Thursday, October 31, 2002 - 06:40 AM UTC

Quoted Text

While I dont know if the Germans winterized their motorcycles, I have found a photo in one of my reference books which may be helpful.



The book in question is Panzers in Russia 1941-43 by Bruce Quarrie, number 9 in the WW2 Photo Album series, (most likely long out of print)



This guy's bike has a relatively knobby back tire which might have helped a little.

That being said, riding an MC in the winter is anything but fun. I've ridden in 18 degree weather for about 25 miles. Even with down and leather, you get very cold, cold that doesn;t go away for hours in the warmth of a building. Snow uner a powered two wheeler is one of the toughest things to ride on. Got caught in a snow shower once. Gives a whole new meaning to gingerly. Rain is another major unpleasantness, even in warm weather. Water permeates everywhere and the evaporation is thouroughly bone chilling. I can't imagine a soldier being at all valuable in combat after an extended ride in bad weather.