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11
P-51D "The Rebel"

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The North American Mustang found its beginnings when Sir Henry Self, head of the British purchasing commission in America approached North American about producing the P-40 under license. North American felt they could develop a superior aircraft in the time it would take to acquire the rights and dies to reproduce the Curtiss fighter. In March of 1940 the British government ordered 320 of the new aircraft sight-unseen. The Mustang's primary innovations were its laminar flow wings, and a cooling system featuring the Meredith effect. The former drastically reduced drag compared the traditional airfoils, and the latter harnessed air warmed by the heat exchanger to produce small amounts of thrust. This offset the drag incurred by cooling surfaces. A feature notably utilized by one of the Mustang's primary rivals, the FW-190. Throughout its service life the Mustang underwent two major changes. The original Allison V-1710 powerplant, although superb at low altitudes, was replaced by the higher flying Packard Merlin engine. And the conservative fared-in cockpit was replaced by a then state-of-the-art seamless bubble canopy. Ensuring the pilot unrivaled visibility. These later variants took on a much different role than their predecessors. The Allison engined variants found use primarily in reconaissance and attack. The later Packard aircraft were the definitive long-ranging dogfighter of the war. Finally providing truly effective daytime bomber escort. And allowing the USAAC to venture deep into German territory to destroy the Luftwaffe in the air as well as on the ground.
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About the Author

About Delbert (Delbert)
FROM: PENNSYLVANIA, UNITED STATES

I'm 47. I've been model building since Dec 2001 and I build everything from wingy things to ground hugger's. esp WWII era. also built a car or two. Some people think my stuff isn't too bad.


Comments

I had a little time so I put together some more information on this specific aircraft. Doug Matthews and Classic Fighters of America are the owners and operators of this North American P-51D Mustang "The Rebel" (Serial No. 44-84933) Doug's Mustang is painted in the scheme of the Mustang flown by Joseph H. Joiner as a Captain in the 336th Fighter Squadron during World War II. Captain Joiner was decorated with the Air Medal (10 Oak Leaf Clusters) and the Distinguished Flying Cross. He flew with the 336th Fighter Squadron in the 8th Air Force’s 4th Fighter Group from May 25, 1944 to February 20, 1945. During this time, Captain Joiner had a total of 4.5 Air Victories and 4 ground victories. History / Previous Identities: 1944 Manufactured in Dallas Texas 1945 until 1957 U.S. Air Force #44-84933N 1957: sold surplus (McClellan AFB) 1957: N2874D (Earl Dakin) 1958: (Doug Brown) 1962: (Kathleen Murphy) 1964: (Edward Fleming) 1965: CF-RUT 1965: (Don McGillivary) 1967: (Charles Roberts) 1967: N201F (Futrell Aircraft Sales) 1969: (Suffolk Flight Assoc.) 1978: (John Mark) 2005: (Harry Barr) 2007: (Doug Matthews) June - qualified at Reno for Sept. races 2008: Registered as N151CF laters Delbert
JUL 18, 2013 - 11:54 AM