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D9R Armored Bulldozer

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Introduction
Well Meng’s D9 Armored Bulldozer does not need too much of an introduction at all. Arriving to the modelling scene near the end of 2013, this beast quickly jumped to the top of many a modeler’s stash pile. Even at 1/35, this thing is huge! The box is huge, the parts are huge and of course the finished product is as well!!

A while back I had the pleasure of reviewing Meng’s kit right here on Armorama: D9R Armored Bulldozer Review Live links . One of the best thing about this kit, aside from the price which was not too bad at all, is the ease at which it constructs. From the onset of the first sprue cut to the last glued part, every bit of the kit just kind of falls together!!

Construction
The cab interior appeared to be riddled with ejector pin marks, but there were actually only two that showed up after some dry fitting. The cab itself was a quick process and the fit of the parts allows for a decent dry fitting to inspect as you go. The most time consuming part of the build would have to be the tracks. But once you get through the cleanup process of the individual links, you can get right into a rhythm and assembly will move right along.

Before I started I realized there was some interior painting that would need to be done so a sub-assembly approach was needed. I tried to keep as much of the interior parts loose until after all of the painting was done, followed by a quick assembly and then some weathering as I felt this was in need of some dusty business!

Not too long after the interior was done it was time to get moving on the rest of the build; the lower hull of this behemoth fell together pretty much as the upper as most of these parts are rather large and the fit exceptional. Very little sanding was required over most of the kit with the small exception of the bogies. The fit was certainly not the worst I have seen but there was some cleanup needed around these areas.

One of the more notable features to the D9 Bulldozer it its ripper attachment off the back. This is a hydraulic piston driven claw protruding off the back of the dozer. There are a few parts to this section but moving carefully through the construction provides the complete movements of the armature after you are done.

With more or less all of the main construction out of the way, it was time to get the tracks together so I could get onto the fun part of any build for me; the painting. This was relatively painless and again, taking your time during the construction ensures each set of track will be workable when done.

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About the Author

About Todd Michalak (TRM5150)
FROM: MASSACHUSETTS, UNITED STATES

I am building what I like, when I like and how I like it; having fun doing it. I have been building and finishing models on and off my whole life but the past ten years things really exploded. Just about anything goes when it comes to hitting the bench, but wrecked armor, rusted hulks, ships or ...


Comments

Of course, your WIP photos completely disprove my theory, but it's a phenomenal piece of work
MAY 01, 2014 - 08:10 PM
The deft use of the sand clinging to the dozer is very realistic!
MAY 02, 2014 - 02:33 AM
Thanks again Mark!! Sorry to disband any "theories" there were!! Thanks Bill! Aside form the numerous pictures of these things completely covered in dust there are plenty of interesting shots where the sandy mess seems to collect in a few spots leaving the rest, well...not. I was looking at some pics of these in the Golan Heights and the dark brown mud was very enticing... Maybe next time!!
MAY 02, 2014 - 02:50 AM
Todd,
JUL 20, 2015 - 07:43 PM
Sorry about that. I have a question. In step 5 there is a some small/big screws in spruce A that needs to cut in a different way, but where those screws goes to? The instructions doesn't specified where. I think there is another step that mention the same thing. Any help? Thanks!
JUL 20, 2015 - 07:46 PM
Hello Jose, Yeah, the instructions are a bit shady in that section. In step 5 there is to small graphics at the top...one square and one round....the square one is correct, the round is not. The bolt heads are to be installed on the backside of the cylinders...facing the ripper. there are two different sizes. In this picture you can see where they go. I found it easier to make my own bolt heads, this is why they are white in the picture. Also, I added some bolt heads to the large piston for the dozer blade! Hope this helps....have fun!!
JUL 20, 2015 - 08:30 PM
Thanks for the tip! I assumed that is the same procedure for step 37 also. Can't wait till painting, but I'm little concern about the tracks when I get to that step.
JUL 21, 2015 - 07:48 PM
How did you make the bolts? You right! Was hard for me to cut a nice one.
JUL 22, 2015 - 02:54 AM
In step 26 Tracks assembly, parts A5 and A6 is state use to finish the whole track. What they mean about that? I didn't see those parts in your pics unless you painted them black after finished the track. Also, do I supposed to punch a hole in part C2 to connect the link with C1?
JUL 23, 2015 - 02:32 AM
Hello Jose, Sorry for the delay. I am away at the IPMS Nationals in Ohio. The bolt heads were made using the RP TOOLZ Hexagonal punch and die set. As for the tracks, the written English in the instructions is a bit off. I have to assume they were meaning you need to finish the construction of the tracks. They are not too bad once you get going. No, you do not need to punch anything out. If you take the side with the post on it and lay it down so the post is sticking up, slide the next link over the post and attach the non-posted link to the top of the post via thin cement or CA. I put a tiny drop with a small paint brush on top of the post carefully and then place the small flat link on...the open end will slide down over the next post.....and so forth. I would go out about 10 links and then set that aside to dry and start another run. When I finished the 10, then I would put the track pads on after letting them sit for maybe 10 or 15 minutes. If don correctly...and the glue is on top of the post the links will be working. Like I said...it get easier once you start. Best of luck!
JUL 25, 2015 - 03:10 AM